Tuesday, July 31, 2012

PADI IDC in Dauin for July 2012 has been completed

After 9 days of blood, sweat and tears and, uh, oh yes, fun, we finally could call the July 2012 PADI IDC in Dauin a job well done!

Rich, Nick and Matt met all performance requirements and all three of them should be ready to start the PADI IE, kicking off Friday 3rd August and they should be the newest PADI Instructors on the block come afternoon 4th August!.

Matt, Rich and Rich before the 800 meter snorkel

It was a fun course and despite the tropical depression that went over us for almost 5 days, we had a good time and a couple laughs! Also the cold that I had for 7 days couldn't temper the good mood portrayed by all during this IDC.

Open Water earlier today

One first can be noted for this IDC, Nick was the first student that originated from the BVI (or British Virgin Islands) during my programs.
With Rich and Marcia from the USA, Matt and Andreas from Germany and Johan from Sweden, it was all around a very international affair again, once more!

Rescue practice and workshop in open water

Tomorrow is time for the EFR Instructor course with Matt and Thursday is hopefully a day set aside for diving!

Marcia who completed her IDCS course, well done

Andreas and Johan staffed, it was my pleasure gentlemen, hope to see you again, soon!

Time to sign off from this IDC and I hope to see you soon in one of my other IDC programs around South East Asia. Your next chance is starting 19th August on Gili Air in Indonesia, followed by an IDC starting 4th September on Koh Phangan in Thailand and 18th September I'm back here in Dauin again!

Looking forward seeing you around!

Camille

Friday, July 27, 2012

PADI IDC in Dauin for July 2012 is half way

Time flies when you're having fun and that's the case during this PADI IDC in Dauin, the Philippines with PADI CDC Center Sea Explorers and the candidates Rich from the USA, Nick from the BVI (my first student from there!) and Matt from Germany with Johan from Sweden, Andreas from Germany staffing and Marcia from the USA completing her IDCS course.

At the pool, from left to right; Marcia, Rich, Andreas, Camille, Nick, Johan and Matt

We've been busy and have had a go at classroom presentations, confined water, skill circuits, rescue exercise # 7, exams and various workshops. Intense but fun!

Nick during a confined water briefing

Tomorrow is our first day in the Open Water, when each student needs to prepare two presentations.

Matt during the skill circuit

Rich doing a no mask swim

It's a steep learning curve for all of them and especially the first couple of days the curve is really steel, with many new things being presented to you and the candidates trying to make the best out of it! It's challenging at moments but the rewards of passing grades make up all the blood, sweat and tears from the previous evening!

Rescue exercise # 7

My schedule offers two more IDC's this year in the Philippines, one program starting rather soon on 18th September, in Dauin again and on 20th November you can find me back on Malapascua. Contact me for more information on these programs and I'm looking forward seeing there!

Camille

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Sign up PADI promo bonus for the Philippines IDC programs with Sea Explorers

Camille and the Sea Explorers PADI CDC Center in Dauin and the PADI 5* IDC Center on Malapascua are happy to present a sign up PADI promo bonus for the next 8 IDC candidates that sing up for a Sea Explorers PADI IDC in the Philippines.

The PADI promo bonus pack consists of a PADI backpack, a PADI polo shirt, a PADI lanyard, a PADI pen and a PADI hat as pictured above.

If you sign up and pay a deposit for a PADI IDC with Sea Explorers, you will receive your PADI bonus pack during your IDC.

The next PADI IDC with Sea Explorers PADI CDC Center in Dauin is scheduled to start 18th September 2012 and another IDC is scheduled with Sea Explorers PADI 5* IDC Center on Malapascua for 20th November 2012.

If you like to receive information on these IDC programs, please contact Camille.

Camille

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

PADI IDCS course in Dauin, Philippines July 2012 and staffing; all with a smile

The July 2012 IDC in Dauin is a busy program with 3 IDC candidates, Marcia completing her IDCS course and two people, Johan and Andreas are staffing.

Marcia during the General Standards & Procedures exam

Marcia is busy meeting the performance requirements for her IDCS course. She passed all her theory exams and the standards exam with flying colors and the skill circuit is also under control. We're working on the evaluation training and tomorrow she will complete her preassessment training with a Knowledge Development presentation and a confined water presentation.

Mask removal & replacement during the skill circuit

We've done already a couple of IDCS related presentations by me and after she completes the preassessment training, she will audit this complete IDC.

From left to right; Marcia, Johan and Andreas

Besides Marcia completing her IDCS course, we also have Johan and Andreas who are staffing this IDC. This means that they're already staff instructors but now want some real life experience.

If you're an instructor looking to further your own dive career, maybe you're ready to start your IDCS course. The next options to complete this course with me are 19th August on Gili Air in Indonesia, 4th September on Koh Phangan in Thailand and 18th September back here in Dauin in the Philippines again. See you there!

Camille

PADI IDC Dauin July 2012; IDC with a smile!

The PADI IDC in Dauin for July 2012 has kicked off this morning ans we're a nice group with 3 IDC candidates; Rich, Nick and Matt, one IDCS candidate; Marcia and two people staffing; Johan and Andreas.

Johan giving the OK signal for the other candidates during the exams! From left to right. Matt, Johan, Nick, Marcia and Rich

We completed all the red tape this morning, the Orientation presentation, started on the theory exams and completed a skill circuit with rescue exercise # 7 at the end of the day. A busy day indeed.

Physics

The next couple of days will be filled with more exams. presentations by me, confined water and also an open water training dive thrown in. Stay tuned, more updates will follow soon.

My next IDC dates will be 19th August on Gili Air in Indonesia, 4th September on Koh Phangan in Thailand and 18th September back in Dauin in the Philippines again! Get in touch with me if you're interested in these or other dates for your own IDC.

Camille

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

One more batch of combined animals

Just to keep you busy until my next PADI IDC starts, in 5 days time in Dauin, Philippines, here are some more combined animals!

Parrot tiger anybody?

A dogphin

Waldog

Juvenile eledugongs, extra cuteness bonus!

A giraffe lion fish?

It's truly amazing what nature or a little photoshop can bring us. Enjoy until my next IDC update, coming in fast!

Camille

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Scuba diving variations

Here are a few scuba diving variations. They're funny and innovative as well!

For scuba diving air guzzlers

Innovative indeed

Scuba diving dog

Rebreather cat

Later this month I start a PADI IDC in Dauin, Philippines, 23rd July. Stay tuned for updates on this program.

Camille

Friday, July 6, 2012

Does Drowning look like drowning?

Recently I came across a very interesting article, written by Mario Vittone and it dealt with the way a drowning looks like in real life compared to what we know from movies or TV series and shows. The article originates from 2010 and I don't want to with hold it from you, hopefully you will be able to make a difference one day for being able to recognize a drowning accident in progress and save somebody's life!

The article starts with a story in which a former lifeguard jumps in the water and starts swimming towards a couple who are splashing about. The bewildered couple tries to signal to him that they are fine but he keeps going and much to their surprise, he goes for their 9 year old daughter, not even a full 9 feet/3 meters away from them.
Once the daughter is in the safe arms of the rescuer, she can manage to call for her Daddy.

How did this former lifeguard know – from fifty feet/15 meters away – what the father couldn’t recognize from just ten? Drowning is not the violent, splashing, call for help that most people expect. The former lifeguard was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew knows what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” she hadn’t made a sound. "As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story' says Martio Vittone. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing, and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for, is rarely seen in real life.


The Instinctive Drowning Response – so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect. There is very little splashing, no waving, and no yelling or calls for help of any kind. To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic from the surface drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children, age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents) – of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In ten percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening (source: CDC). Drowning does not look like drowning – Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene Magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:

Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled, before speech occurs.
Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.
Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.
Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.
From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.

1. Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary, or overlaid, function. Breathing must be fulīŦlled, before speech occurs.

2. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

3. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.

4. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.

5. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.


If somebody is trashing and yelling in the water, that doesn't mean they're not in trouble though, they;re still experiencing some form of aquatic distress.

Not always present before the instinctive drowning response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long – but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:

  • Head low in the water, mouth at water level
  • Head tilted back with mouth open
  • Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
  • Eyes closed
  • Hair over forehead or eyes
  • Not using legs – Vertical
  • Hyperventilating or gasping
  • Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
  • Trying to roll over on the back
  • Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder.
So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK – don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you alright?” If they can answer at all – they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents – children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.

Camille